Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/59212
Title: Slope stability analysis considering antecedent rainfall process
Authors: Tang, D.
Li, D.-Q.
Zhou, C.-B.
Phoon, K.-K. 
Keywords: Antecedent rainfall
Safety factor
Slope
Stability
Unsaturated seepage analysis
Issue Date: Nov-2013
Source: Tang, D.,Li, D.-Q.,Zhou, C.-B.,Phoon, K.-K. (2013-11). Slope stability analysis considering antecedent rainfall process. Yantu Lixue/Rock and Soil Mechanics 34 (11) : 3239-3248. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Based on the measured rainfall data in the Three Gorges reservoir area, this paper investigates the effect of different initial conditions on different types of soil slope stability. A method to reflect the real initial conditions of the water content in the slope is recommended. Unsaturated seepage analysis is adopted to study the effect of antecedent rainfall on different types of soil slope stability. The typical sand and clay slopes are taken as examples to investigate the effect of antecedent rainfall on slope stability. The results indicate that the effect of the initial conditions on different types of soil slope stability can differ considerably. It is recommended that the steady-state seepage field under average annual rainfall can be used as the initial conditions for transient seepage analysis. The lower soil permeability coefficient, the greater impact of antecedent rainfall can on slope stability, and the longer time affected by antecedent rainfall. It is recommended that more than 15 days antecedent rainfall should be considered for sand and clay slopes stability analysis. Furthermore, more computational effort for sand slopes will depend on the 5 days rainfall before these 15 days rainfall. The short term and high density antecedent rainfall has a significant effect on sand slope stability, whereas the long term and low density antecedent rainfall has a significant effect on clay slope. The cumulative antecedent rainfall can be taken as a criterion to determine the minimum factor of safety. For the sand slopes, the time corresponding to the minimum factor of safety matches well with the time corresponding to the maximum 10-day cumulative antecedent rainfall, whereas, for the clay slopes, it matches well with the time corresponding to the maximum 15-day cumulative antecedent rainfall.
Source Title: Yantu Lixue/Rock and Soil Mechanics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/59212
ISSN: 10007598
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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