Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2011.06.060
Title: Emissions of particulate-bound elements from stationary diesel engine: Characterization and risk assessment
Authors: Betha, R.
Balasubramanian, R. 
Keywords: Health risk
Particulate matter
Stationary engine
Ultra low sulphur diesel
Waste cooking oil biodiesel
Issue Date: Sep-2011
Source: Betha, R., Balasubramanian, R. (2011-09). Emissions of particulate-bound elements from stationary diesel engine: Characterization and risk assessment. Atmospheric Environment 45 (30) : 5273-5281. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2011.06.060
Abstract: There has been an increasing concern about the emissions of airborne particulate matter (PM) from diesel engines because of their close association with adverse health and environmental impacts. Among the alternative fuels being considered, biodiesel made by the transesterification of waste cooking oil has received wide attention in recent years because of its low cost and the added advantage of reducing waste oil disposal. This study was conducted to make a comparative evaluation of the particulate-bound elements emitted from ultra low sulphur diesel (ULSD) and waste cooking oil-derived biodiesel (B100) and a blend of both the fuels (B50). It was observed that the PM mass concentrations were reduced by about 36% when B100 was used. Crustal elements such as Mg, K and Al were found to be in higher concentrations compared to other elements emitted from both B100 and ULSD. Zn, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Mg, Ba, K were found to be higher in the biodiesel exhaust while Co, Pb, Mn, Cd, Sr, and As were found to be higher in the ULSD exhaust. To evaluate the potential health risk due to inhalation of PM emitted from diesel engines running on ULSD and B100, health risk estimates based on exposure and dose-response assessments of particulate-bound elements were calculated assuming exposure for 24 h. The findings indicate that the exposure to PM of the B100 exhaust is relatively more hazardous and may pose adverse health effects compared to ULSD. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Source Title: Atmospheric Environment
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/59035
ISSN: 13522310
DOI: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2011.06.060
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

26
checked on Dec 7, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

24
checked on Nov 22, 2017

Page view(s)

27
checked on Dec 10, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.