Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12369-012-0148-9
Title: Telerobotic Pointing Gestures Shape Human Spatial Cognition
Authors: Cabibihan, J.-J. 
So, W.-C.
Saj, S.
Zhang, Z.
Keywords: Human-robot interaction
Pointing gesture
Social robotics
Spatial memory
Telepresence robots
Issue Date: Aug-2012
Source: Cabibihan, J.-J.,So, W.-C.,Saj, S.,Zhang, Z. (2012-08). Telerobotic Pointing Gestures Shape Human Spatial Cognition. International Journal of Social Robotics 4 (3) : 263-272. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12369-012-0148-9
Abstract: This paper aimed to explore whether human beings can understand gestures produced by telepresence robots. If it were the case, they can derive meaning conveyed in telerobotic gestures when processing spatial information. We conducted two experiments over Skype in the present study. Participants were presented with a robotic interface that had arms, which were teleoperated by an experimenter. The robot can point to virtual locations that represented certain entities. In Experiment 1, the experimenter described spatial locations of fictitious objects sequentially in two conditions: speech only condition (SO, verbal descriptions clearly indicated the spatial layout) and speech and robotic gesture condition (SR, verbal descriptions were ambiguous but accompanied by robotic pointing gestures). Participants were then asked to recall the objects' spatial locations. We found that the number of spatial locations recalled in the SR condition was on par with that in the SO condition, suggesting that telerobotic pointing gestures compensated ambiguous speech during the process of spatial information. In Experiment 2, the experimenter described spatial locations non-sequentially in the SR and SO conditions. Surprisingly, the number of spatial locations recalled in the SR condition was even higher than that in the SO condition, suggesting that telerobotic pointing gestures were more powerful than speech in conveying spatial information when information was presented in an unpredictable order. The findings provide evidence that human beings are able to comprehend telerobotic gestures, and importantly, integrate these gestures with co-occurring speech. This work promotes engaging remote collaboration among humans through a robot intermediary. © 2012 Springer Science & Business Media BV.
Source Title: International Journal of Social Robotics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/57600
ISSN: 18754791
DOI: 10.1007/s12369-012-0148-9
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

15
checked on Dec 13, 2017

Page view(s)

28
checked on Dec 15, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.