Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/53380
Title: CHARACTERIZATION AND REGULATION OF FUNCTION OF THE CANDIDA ALBICANS SEPTIN-ASSOCIATED KINASE GIN4
Authors: AU YONG JIE YING
Keywords: Candida albicans, Gin4, Septins
Issue Date: 23-Jan-2014
Source: AU YONG JIE YING (2014-01-23). CHARACTERIZATION AND REGULATION OF FUNCTION OF THE CANDIDA ALBICANS SEPTIN-ASSOCIATED KINASE GIN4. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The septins, a family of GTP-binding and filament-forming proteins which are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human, are implicated in diverse cellular processes. In both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, the organization and dynamics of septins are regulated in a cell-cycle dependent manner. However, the mechanisms underlying this regulation are poorly understood. The human pathogenic fungus C. albicans is able to grow in at least three distinct morphological forms, the yeast, pseudohyphae and hyphae. The transition between the different morphologies involves direct regulation of the septins. This process requires the septin-associated kinase Gin4. In this study, using C. albicans as a model, we discover that Gin4 plays important roles in regulating the septins through different domains at different stages of the cell cycle. Our studies demonstrated that the nonkinase C-terminal region of Gin4 is crucially required for septin assembly before bud emergence; while its N-terminal kinase domain is activated upon entry into mitosis, to regulate septin ring dynamics. We went on to show that the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28 mediates activation of Gin4 kinase in regulating septin ring dynamics. Our studies provide clues to the mechanisms of cell-cycle dependent regulation of the septins. Unexpectedly, we uncover a region in Gin4 (Nucleolus-associating domain: NAD), located at close proximity to the consensus CDK sites, with novel nucleolus localization and with function independent of septin assembly, suggesting that Gin4 could possibly have a previously unappreciated role in cell cycle progression.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/53380
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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