Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.09.032
Title: Morphology and microstructure of subcortical structures at birth: A large-scale Asian neonatal neuroimaging study
Authors: Qiu, A. 
Fortier, M.V.
Bai, J.
Zhang, X.
Chong, Y.-S.
Kwek, K.
Saw, S.-M. 
Godfrey, K.M.
Gluckman, P.D.
Meaney, M.J.
Keywords: Diffusion tensor imaging
Infant brain
Magnetic resonance imaging
Myelination
Issue Date: 15-Jan-2013
Source: Qiu, A., Fortier, M.V., Bai, J., Zhang, X., Chong, Y.-S., Kwek, K., Saw, S.-M., Godfrey, K.M., Gluckman, P.D., Meaney, M.J. (2013-01-15). Morphology and microstructure of subcortical structures at birth: A large-scale Asian neonatal neuroimaging study. NeuroImage 65 : 315-323. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.09.032
Abstract: This paper presents the growth pattern and sexual dimorphism of the thalamus and basal ganglia in a large-scale Asian neonatal cohort using both T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Our study observed a robust growth of the thalamus and basal ganglia (caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and anterior limb of internal capsule) beyond the overall brain growth in the early postnatal period (36-43. weeks of the gestational age). Additionally, the microstructure of the two structures was integrated as reflected by an increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) and a decrease in axial and radial water diffusivities in the first few weeks of life. Sexual dimorphism was only observed in the whole brain growth and the left thalamic volume but not in the other volumes or DTI measures of the basal ganglia and thalamus at birth. Even though the pattern of sexual dimorphism in the total brain volume is present at birth and persists throughout postnatal brain development, sexual dimorphisms of the basal ganglia and thalamus differ from those found in later stages of brain development, indicating that regionally distinct patterns of postnatal brain development between males and females arise after birth. © 2012 Elsevier Inc..
Source Title: NeuroImage
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/52539
ISSN: 10538119
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.09.032
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