Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/51999
Title: BIG SHOES TO FILL: THE POTENTIAL OF SEAWALLS TO FUNCTION AS ROCKY SHORE SURROGATES
Authors: LAI WEN YA SAMANTHA
Keywords: Seawall, Rocky shore, Stable Isotopes, Community, Ecology, Reconciliation
Issue Date: 22-Aug-2013
Source: LAI WEN YA SAMANTHA (2013-08-22). BIG SHOES TO FILL: THE POTENTIAL OF SEAWALLS TO FUNCTION AS ROCKY SHORE SURROGATES. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Land reclamation and coastal development have converted or degraded large areas of natural intertidal habitats in Singapore, resulting in the loss of coastal habitats and biodiversity. In their place, the total length of seawalls is set to increase, from 319.23 km of presently to more than 600 km by 2060. Given the ubiquity of seawalls and their potential for supporting coastal communities, it is important that conservationists embrace ecological engineering as an additional tool to conserve near shore biodiversity.This thesis (i) quantifies the significant coastal transformations over this period and evaluates the future of marine habitat conservation and sustainability in Singapore, (ii) compares the communities on seawalls with those of natural rocky shores to evaluate the artificial habitat?s potential as a surrogate of the natural one and (iii) uses stable isotope analyses to further elucidate the ecological causes for the community differences observed between seawalls and rocky shores. Main research findings show that seawalls currently fail to act as surrogate habitats of rocky shores, and suggests that the lack of primary productivity could be one of the root causes for the lower diversity observed in the artificial habitat.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/51999
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Open)

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