Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1115/IPC2008-64186
Title: Subscour displacement in clays from physical model tests
Authors: Been, K.
Sancio, R.B.
Ahrabian, D.
Van Kesteren, W.
Croasdale, K.
Palmer, A. 
Issue Date: 2009
Source: Been, K.,Sancio, R.B.,Ahrabian, D.,Van Kesteren, W.,Croasdale, K.,Palmer, A. (2009). Subscour displacement in clays from physical model tests. Proceedings of the Biennial International Pipeline Conference, IPC 4 : 239-245. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1115/IPC2008-64186
Abstract: A subscour soil displacement model is a key component to determine the safe burial depth of offshore pipelines in ice scoured environments. In order to calibrate numerical models and physical tests carried out in geotechnical centrifuges, 3D ice scour tests were carried out in a dredging flume at a scale approaching that of observed scour depths in the Caspian sea. Two soil failure mechanisms were observed. For steep keels, the soil is mainly pushed up into a mound in front of the keel. For shallow angle keels most of the scoured soil is forced under the keel and to the side of the indentor. Each mechanism results in a different subscour displacement pattern. Subscour displacement equations that include the effect of soil properties and keel angle are presented. While these equations are considered an improvement on existing sub-scour models, there remain limitations to their application in 3D sub- scour until further information relating scour depth and width to soil strength becomes available. Copyright © 2008 by ASME.
Source Title: Proceedings of the Biennial International Pipeline Conference, IPC
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/50804
ISBN: 9780791848609
DOI: 10.1115/IPC2008-64186
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

11
checked on Dec 5, 2017

Page view(s)

35
checked on Dec 9, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.