Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1742-9544.2010.00007.x
Title: Cross-Linguistic Differences in Digit Memory Span
Authors: Chan, M.E. 
Elliott, J.M. 
Keywords: Cognitive processes
Cross-cultural comparisons
Memory
Memory and cognition
Phonological loop
Psycholinguistics
Visuospatial sketchpad
Issue Date: Mar-2011
Source: Chan, M.E., Elliott, J.M. (2011-03). Cross-Linguistic Differences in Digit Memory Span. Australian Psychologist 46 (1) : 25-30. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1742-9544.2010.00007.x
Abstract: This study investigated whether the better performance of the Chinese in digit memory span tasks was due only to the shorter pronunciation duration of Chinese digit names, or to enhanced visuospatial sketchpad abilities, or to both. Results of the experiment showed that the Chinese outperformed their Malay counterparts in digit memory span tasks because Chinese digit names had shorter pronunciation durations than Malay digit names and not because the Chinese had better visuospatial sketchpad abilities than the Malays. The results thus support Baddeley's phonological loop hypothesis as an account for cross-linguistic differences in digit memory spans. Because memory traces are subject to decay and the phonological store is temporally limited, the shorter the pronunciation duration of digit names in a language, the more digits one can rehearse within a limited time period, and therefore the larger is one's short-term digit span in that language. © 2011 The Australian Psychological Society.
Source Title: Australian Psychologist
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/49977
ISSN: 00050067
DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-9544.2010.00007.x
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