Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1097/WAD.0b013e3181ec18ae
Title: Coping strategies influence caregiver outcomes among Asian family caregivers of persons with dementia in Singapore
Authors: Lim, J.
Griva, K. 
Goh, J.
Chionh, H.L.
Yap, P. 
Keywords: burden
caregiver
coping
dementia
gain
Issue Date: Jan-2011
Source: Lim, J., Griva, K., Goh, J., Chionh, H.L., Yap, P. (2011-01). Coping strategies influence caregiver outcomes among Asian family caregivers of persons with dementia in Singapore. Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders 25 (1) : 34-41. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1097/WAD.0b013e3181ec18ae
Abstract: This cross-sectional study used the stress and coping paradigm to examine the factors associated with negative and positive adjustment outcomes among Asian family caregivers of persons with dementia (PWD) in Singapore. One hundred seven family caregivers completed measures assessing patient illness characteristics, general coping styles of caregivers, specific dementia management strategies, religion and spirituality, and caregiver adjustment outcomes of burden and gain. Multiple regressions revealed that behavioral problems in the PWD, dementia severity, and the use of behavioral disengagement and criticism as coping strategies were significant predictors of burden accounting for 48% of the explained variance [F(4,99)=23.12, P<0.001]. The only significant predictor of gain was the use of encouragement as a specific dementia management strategy, explaining 18% of variance [F(3,102)=7.39, P<0.001]. Religion and spirituality predicted gain indirectly through the use of encouragement. Coping strategies had an independent effect on caregiver outcomes above and beyond PWD illness characteristics and caregiver characteristics. Hence, caregiver interventions should target coping strategies to improve outcomes of caregiving for dementia. Findings also support the need to examine religion and spirituality in future studies of caregiver adjustment outcomes and to explore the factors not measured in this study that might explain gain. Copyright © 2011 by Lippincott Williams &Wilkins.
Source Title: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/49969
ISSN: 08930341
DOI: 10.1097/WAD.0b013e3181ec18ae
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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