Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1080/0966369X.2011.617906
Title: 'Shades of grey': Spaces in and beyond trafficking for Thai Women involved in commercial sexual labour in Sydney and Singapore
Authors: Yea, S. 
Keywords: commercial sexual labour
methodologies
migration trajectories
sex trafficking
Thailand
Issue Date: Feb-2012
Source: Yea, S. (2012-02). 'Shades of grey': Spaces in and beyond trafficking for Thai Women involved in commercial sexual labour in Sydney and Singapore. Gender, Place and Culture 19 (1) : 42-60. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1080/0966369X.2011.617906
Abstract: In this article I explore the migration trajectories of some Thai women trafficked internationally for commercial sexual exploitation, suggesting that many figuratively 'cross the border' between coerced and consensual existence in volatile migrant sex industries during the course of their migration experiences, thus complicating debates around the notion of choice in 'sex' trafficking. In exploring these women's transitions I seek to understand why women who had either never previously been sex workers or who were sex workers operating without duress, but who were then trafficked for commercial sexual exploitation remain in, or re-enter volatile forms of migrant sex work at a later point under voluntary arrangements. In answering this question I focus on the temporal and spatial aspects of individual women's experiences in migrant sex industries drawing in detail on the narratives of two Thai women trafficked to Sydney, Australia and Singapore. I make some suggestions about methodologies used in trafficking research that can assist in bringing to light some of these complex time-space dimensions of women's experiences through their shifting positions in commercial sexual labour. The article also reflects on the implications of these women's trajectories for the 'prostitution debate' as it relates to trafficking for commercial sexual exploitation by suggesting that many trafficked women occupy ambiguous or in-between positions in migrant sex industries, neither easily distinguishable by the label of victim of trafficking or migrant sex worker. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
Source Title: Gender, Place and Culture
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/49720
ISSN: 0966369X
DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2011.617906
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