Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/49223
Title: ENHANCED TOPICAL AND TRANSDERMAL GELS FOR NEUROPATHIC PAIN AND SEDATION
Authors: LI FANG
Keywords: neuropathic pain, sedation, transdermal delivery, topical delivery, chemical penetration enhancer, nanoparticulate organogel
Issue Date: 18-Jul-2013
Source: LI FANG (2013-07-18). ENHANCED TOPICAL AND TRANSDERMAL GELS FOR NEUROPATHIC PAIN AND SEDATION. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The thesis focused on the incorporation of chemical penetration enhancers into novel topical and transdermal formulations to achieve enhanced percutaneous permeation of sedatives, analgesics and anaesthetics with possible improvements for unmet medical needs. The topical amitriptyline and ketamine hydrogel with farnesol showed enhanced permeation in vitro. The first reported in vivo study demonstrated minimal systemic plasma concentrations and systemic tissue distributions with high drug concentrations in local skin and muscle tissues, indicating the potential clinical efficacy on peripheral neuropathic pain. The novel transdermal midazolam nanoparticulate propofol organogel for procedural sedation showed controlled release and improved permeation of both drugs in vitro with the nanoparticles facilitated the release of midazolam. Both formulations remained stable after 6-month storage at 4°C. The molecular mechanisms of the permeation enhancement of menthol and farnesol were found to be formation of menthol-amitriptyline and farnesol-skin lipids complexes by isothermal titration calorimetry. In summary, both formulations were safe, stable, and potentially clinically efficacious.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/49223
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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