Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/48647
Title: SURFACE ENGINEERING OF COLLOIDAL SEMICONDUCTOR NANOCRYSTALS FOR POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS IN DIAGNOSTICS
Authors: XU YANG
Keywords: simiconductor nanocrystals, silica encapsulation, multifunctional, hollow silica, dimer, microfluidic diagnostics
Issue Date: 21-Jun-2013
Source: XU YANG (2013-06-21). SURFACE ENGINEERING OF COLLOIDAL SEMICONDUCTOR NANOCRYSTALS FOR POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS IN DIAGNOSTICS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This thesis explores different surface engineering strategies with respect to colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) for the systematic build-up of novel nanoheterostructures for potential applications in diagnostics. Firstly, site-selective encapsulation of the core region of branched semiconductor tetrapods with silica was achieved. This facilitated the fabrication of structurally well-defined nanocomposites capable of dual emission at both visible and IR wavelengths, as well as particles which exhibit both fluorescence and strong magnetic response. Removal of the interior semiconductor structures via acid-based etching resulted in hollow silica structures that were explored as potential drug-delivery vehicles. Additionally, via suitable engineering of the surface functionality of NCs/amphiphilic polymer conjugates, a unique strategy was devised to obtain exquisite control over the stoichiometry of the active surface functional groups on each NC. Finally, the highly sensitive detection of a histidine decarboxylase gene from human white blood samples in a microfluidic platform was achieved using nanorod/amhiphilic polymer conjugates.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/48647
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