Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/48638
Title: GIANT CLAMS (SUBFAMILY TRIDACNINAE) IN SINGAPORE: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE
Authors: NEO MEI LIN
Keywords: Conservation, Dispersal models, Giant clam, Larval autecology, Population genetics, Restocking
Issue Date: 16-Aug-2013
Source: NEO MEI LIN (2013-08-16). GIANT CLAMS (SUBFAMILY TRIDACNINAE) IN SINGAPORE: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Giant clams (family Cardiidae, subfamily Tridacninae) are charismatic invertebrates that are commercially significant in many parts of the Indo-Pacific. Singapore¿s reefs once supported five species of giant clams: Hippopus hippopus, Tridacna crocea, T. gigas, T. maxima and T. squamosa. Numbers, however, have dropped dramatically over the past few decades, probably due to human exploitation and habitat degradation. As part of the greater effort to restore giant clam populations, this thesis examines key information to assist their management and conservation. I first provide two literature reviews looking at the ecological importance of tridacnids as well as a historical examination of their presence in Singapore. Part 2 focusses on Singapore¿s giant clam population status and connectivity patterns via extensive surveys, population genetics, and biophysical dispersal modelling. Finally, part 3 consists of various larvae-based experiments (the results of which will contribute to the enhancement of both mariculture operations and biophysical models). Together, these studies provide both novel insights into giant clam ecology and essential data for ongoing restocking efforts.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/48638
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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