Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/47528
Title: INNOVATIONS TO IMPROVE MEDICATION USE APPROPRIATENESS AMONG ELDERLY NURSING HOME RESIDENTS IN SINGAPORE
Authors: YAP KAI ZHEN
Keywords: Nursing home, Prescribing appropriateness, Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, Laxative, Antipsychotics, Psychotropics
Issue Date: 22-Oct-2012
Source: YAP KAI ZHEN (2012-10-22). INNOVATIONS TO IMPROVE MEDICATION USE APPROPRIATENESS AMONG ELDERLY NURSING HOME RESIDENTS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Achieving prescribing appropriateness for the medically frail elderly nursing home (NH) residents is challenging. Although instruments for assessing prescribing appropriateness (PA) in NHs are available, few have been used in prospective interventions for improving PA and resident outcomes. This thesis reports the development, implementation and pilot evaluation of two inter-professional collaborative practices in the NHs to improve PA and resident outcomes for antipsychotics used in managing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and laxatives, with the pharmacist as the "advocator" of appropriate medication use. These are the Pharmacist-Led Education on Appropriate Drug-use (PLEAD) and Psychotropic Use Monitoring (PUM) programs. The development of a new PA instrument (AALU) for laxatives and a feasibility study on using computer games to manage BPSD were also undertaken. Future evaluations of the sustainability, cost-effectiveness and application of these innovations to other health conditions, and/or pharmacologicals within more NHs in Singapore and elsewhere are needed.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/47528
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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