Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystems.2012.06.001
Title: A cell state splitter and differentiation wave working-model for embryonic stem cell development and somatic cell epigenetic reprogramming
Authors: Lu, K.
Cao, T. 
Gordon, R.
Keywords: Dedifferentiation
Development
Differentiation
Embryogenesis
Embryonic stem cell
Epigenetics
Induced pluripotent stem cell
Mechanobiology
Mechanotransduction
Organizer
Reprogramming
Theoretical biology
Transdifferentiation
Issue Date: 2012
Source: Lu, K., Cao, T., Gordon, R. (2012). A cell state splitter and differentiation wave working-model for embryonic stem cell development and somatic cell epigenetic reprogramming. BioSystems 109 (3) : 390-396. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystems.2012.06.001
Abstract: Cell fate determination and development is a biology question that has yet to be fully answered. During embryogenesis and . in vivo stem cell differentiation, cells/tissues deploy epigenetic mechanisms to accomplish differentiation and give rise to the fully developed organism. Although a biochemistry description of cellular genetics and epigenetics is important, additional mechanisms are necessary to completely solve the problem of embryogenesis, especially differentiation and the spatiotemporal coordination of cells/tissues during morphogenesis. The cell state splitter and differentiation wave working-model was initially proposed to explain the homeostatic primary neural induction in amphibian embryos. Here the model is adopted to explain experimental findings on . in vitro embryonic stem cell, pluripotency and differentiation. Moreover, since somatic cells can be reverted to a stem-cell-like pluripotent state through the laboratory procedure called epigenetic reprogramming, erection of a cell state splitter could be a key event in their successful reprogramming. Overall, the cell state splitter working-model introduces a bistable cytoskeletal mechanism that partially explains cell fate determination and biological development. It offers an interdisciplinary framework that bridges the gap between molecular epigenetics and embryogenesis. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
Source Title: BioSystems
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/47163
ISSN: 03032647
DOI: 10.1016/j.biosystems.2012.06.001
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