Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1002/cbf.1221
Title: Reduced mitotic activity at the periphery of human embryonic stem cell colonies cultured in vitro with mitotically-inactivated murine embryonic fibroblast feeder cells
Authors: Heng, B.C. 
Cao, T. 
Liu, H. 
Rufaihah, A.J. 
Keywords: BrdU
Embryonic
In vitro culture
Mitosis
Stem cells
Issue Date: 2005
Source: Heng, B.C., Cao, T., Liu, H., Rufaihah, A.J. (2005). Reduced mitotic activity at the periphery of human embryonic stem cell colonies cultured in vitro with mitotically-inactivated murine embryonic fibroblast feeder cells. Cell Biochemistry and Function 23 (2) : 141-146. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1002/cbf.1221
Abstract: This study attempted to investigate whether different levels of mitotic activity exist within different physical regions of a human embryonic stem (hES) cell colony. Incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) within newly-synthesized DNA, followed by immunocytochemical staining was used as a means of detecting mitotically-active cells within hES colonies. The results showed rather surprisingly that the highest levels of mitotic activity are primarily concentrated within the central regions of hES colonies, whereas the peripheral regions exhibited reduced levels of cellular proliferation. Two hypothetical mechanisms are therefore proposed for hES colony growth and expansion. Firstly, it is envisaged that the less mitotically-active hES cells at the periphery of the colony are continually migrating outwards, thereby providing space for newly-divided daughter cells within the more mitotically-active central region of the hES colony. Secondly, it is proposed that the newly-divided hES cells within the central region of the colony somehow migrate to the outer periphery. This could possibly explain why the periphery of hES colonies are less mitotically-active, since there would obviously be an extended time-lag before newly-divided daughter cells are ready again for the next cell division. Further investigations need to be carried out to characterize the atypical mechanisms by which hES colonies grow and expand in size. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Source Title: Cell Biochemistry and Function
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/47076
ISSN: 02636484
DOI: 10.1002/cbf.1221
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

7
checked on Dec 6, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

7
checked on Nov 17, 2017

Page view(s)

79
checked on Dec 10, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.