Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/47062
Title: International egg-sharing to provide donor oocytes for clinical assisted reproduction and derivation of nuclear transfer stem cells
Authors: Heng, B.C. 
Keywords: Assisted reproduction
Egg-sharing
Ethics
Nuclear transfer
Oocyte
Stem cells
Issue Date: 2005
Source: Heng, B.C. (2005). International egg-sharing to provide donor oocytes for clinical assisted reproduction and derivation of nuclear transfer stem cells. Reproductive BioMedicine Online 11 (6) : 676-678. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Recent advances in nuclear transfer technology for derivation of patient-specific stem cells have opened up new avenues of therapy for various human diseases. However, a major bottleneck is the severe shortage of human donor oocytes. Egg-sharing in return for subsidized fertility treatment has been suggested as an ethically justifiable and practical solution to ease the shortage of donor oocytes both for derivation of nuclear transfer stem cells and assisted reproduction. However, it is envisioned that many patients would be more comfortable with their supernumerary oocytes going into derivation of nuclear transfer stem cells, rather than having another potential anonymous offspring in assisted reproduction. Nevertheless in more economically developed countries, fertility treatment is easily affordable to a large segment of the population, which reduces the pool of available egg-sharers. In less affluent countries, fertility treatment is often beyond the financial resources of most sub-fertile couples. Hence, a possible solution may be to allow egg-sharing across international borders. Potential egg-sharers would come from less economically-developed countries that are more in need of financial subsidies for sub-fertile couples seeking clinically assisted conception. This is ethically justifiable because it makes fertility treatment affordable to childless couples from poorer countries, while at the same time easing the shortage of donor oocytes in more affluent countries.
Source Title: Reproductive BioMedicine Online
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/47062
ISSN: 14726483
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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