Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/45130
Title: Effects of time processing orientation, agreement preferences and attitude towards foreign businessmen on negotiation adaptation
Authors: Ang, S.H 
Teo, G.
Keywords: Agreement preferences
Attitude
Foreign businessmen
Time processing orientation
Issue Date: 1997
Source: Ang, S.H,Teo, G. (1997). Effects of time processing orientation, agreement preferences and attitude towards foreign businessmen on negotiation adaptation. International Business Review 6 (6) : 625-640. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: An experiment was conducted among Singaporean executives to determine how they adapt to a foreign partner depending on the partner's time processing orientation and agreement preferences, and their attitude towards businessmen from the country the foreign partner was from. Results showed that Singaporean executives tended to have monochronic time processing and preferred written to oral agreements. Further, when a foreign partner exhibited a monochronic processing orientation, these executives had greater liking for and were more willing to accept this trait than when he had a polychronic processing orientation. Liking for the foreign partner was also enhanced. In terms of agreement preferences, the executives showed greater liking for and willingness to accept the trait when the foreign partner had a written than an oral preference. Finally, willingness to accept the foreign partner as a business partner was enhanced once they knew where the foreign partner came from, regardless of their attitude towards businessmen from that country. Implications are discussed and directions for future research furnished. © 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Source Title: International Business Review
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/45130
ISSN: 09695931
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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