Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1086/661768
Title: From physical weight to psychological significance: The contribution of semantic activations
Authors: Zhang, M.
Li, X. 
Issue Date: 2012
Source: Zhang, M., Li, X. (2012). From physical weight to psychological significance: The contribution of semantic activations. Journal of Consumer Research 38 (6) : 1063-1075. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1086/661768
Abstract: Past research has shown that a physical experience can influence metaphorically linked psychological judgment. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been formally tested. This article examines the role of semantic activations underlying such influences, focusing on the effects of a ubiquitous physical experience-"carrying weight"-on consumers' judgment of importance. Five experiments provide converging evidence that semantic activation is the primary underlying process for the effect. Specifically, physically carrying a load is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for processing the concept of importance. The effect is fully mediated by semantic activation of related weight concepts. Moreover, processing the concept of importance does not necessarily influence the physical experience of carrying weight. An affective state such as mental stress (psychological load), however, does have a reciprocal effect on the physical experience of carrying weight, indicating that there might be different pathways between weight experience and its metaphorically linked concepts. © 2011 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Journal of Consumer Research
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/43820
ISSN: 00935301
DOI: 10.1086/661768
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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