Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1145/2240156.2240160
Title: The moderating effects of utilitarian and hedonic values on information technology continuance
Authors: Xu, L.
Lin, J.
Chan, H.C. 
Keywords: Hedonic value
Intention to continue to use
Moderating effects
Nature of the technology
Technology acceptance model
Utilitarian value
Issue Date: 2012
Source: Xu, L., Lin, J., Chan, H.C. (2012). The moderating effects of utilitarian and hedonic values on information technology continuance. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 19 (2). ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1145/2240156.2240160
Abstract: This study examines how the nature of technology affects users' intention to continue using information technologies. It proposes an extended technology acceptance model, with perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and pleasure affecting the intention to continue using a technology. We hypothesized that these effects are moderated by the technology's utilitarian and hedonic values. The model was validated for smartphone functions. A user survey showed that perceived ease of use significantly affected the intention to continue using only for high-utilitarian functions, whereas pleasure affected the intention to continue using only for high-hedonic functions. The effect of perceived ease of use on perceived usefulness was stronger for high-utilitarian than for low-utilitarian functions. The effect of pleasure on perceived usefulness was stronger for high-hedonic than for low-hedonic functions. The results suggest that marketing should consider the nature of the functions. © 2012 ACM.
Source Title: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/42569
ISSN: 10730516
DOI: 10.1145/2240156.2240160
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