Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1109/TEM.2002.808292
Title: Reporting bad news about software projects: Impact of organizational climate and information asymmetry in an individualistic and a collectivistic culture
Authors: Tan, B.C.Y. 
Smith, H.J.
Keil, M.
Montealegre, R.
Keywords: Collectivism
Individualism
Information asymmetry
Mum effect
National culture
Organizational climate
Report bad news
Software project management
Issue Date: 2003
Source: Tan, B.C.Y., Smith, H.J., Keil, M., Montealegre, R. (2003). Reporting bad news about software projects: Impact of organizational climate and information asymmetry in an individualistic and a collectivistic culture. IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management 50 (1) : 64-77. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1109/TEM.2002.808292
Abstract: The reluctance of people to report bad news can be a major contributor to the phenomenon of runaway software projects. If senior managers receive bad news sooner, they may be able to prevent runaway software projects through corrective action. Two factors that are known to impact predisposition to report bad news are organizational climate (whether reporting bad news is likely to result in reward or punishment) and information asymmetry (whether hiding bad news is likely to be possible over time). Using matching experiments in an individualistic (United States) and a collectivistic culture (Singapore), this study investigates how the individualism-collectivism dimension of national culture may moderate the impact of organizational climate and information asymmetry on human predisposition to report bad news. The results revealed that individualism appeared to amplify the impact of organizational climate on predisposition to report bad news (compared to collectivism) whereas collectivism appeared to amplify the impact of information asymmetry on predisposition to report bad news (compared to individualism). When deciding on whether to report bad news about software projects, people from an individualistic culture seemed to be more sensitive to organizational climate whereas people from a collectivistic culture seemed to pay greater attention to information asymmetry. These results have useful implications for practice and research involving cross-cultural software project teams. Beyond these implications, these results add a cultural dimension to our existing knowledge on software project management.
Source Title: IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/42514
ISSN: 00189391
DOI: 10.1109/TEM.2002.808292
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

83
checked on Dec 13, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

65
checked on Nov 16, 2017

Page view(s)

60
checked on Dec 10, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.