Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2004.01.010
Title: Biomechanical strength of deep-frozen versus lyophilized large cortical allografts
Authors: Nather, A. 
Thambyah, A. 
Goh, J.C.H. 
Keywords: Allografts
Biomechanical strength
Cortical
Deep-frozen
Large
Lyophilized
Issue Date: 2004
Source: Nather, A., Thambyah, A., Goh, J.C.H. (2004). Biomechanical strength of deep-frozen versus lyophilized large cortical allografts. Clinical Biomechanics 19 (5) : 526-533. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2004.01.010
Abstract: Objective. To compare biomechanical strength of deep-frozen versus lyophilized large cortical allografts. Design. In vivo transplantation studies performed in tibia of adult cats using 4 cm deep-frozen and lyophilized, gamma-irradiated allografts to bridge large cortical defect model. Background. Bridging large cortical bone defect is a challenging problem. Options include autografts, allografts, bioceramics and prostheses. Allografts provide a suitable option. Methods. Forty mature cats were used. A large defect (4 cm) was created in mid-diaphysis of right tibia. In 16 cats, cortical defect was reconstructed using deep-frozen allografts (-80°C) with intra-medullary rodding. In another 16 cats, lyophilized, gamma-irradiated allografts were used. Observation periods include 8, 12, 16 and 24 weeks. The specimens were procured together with unoperated legs as controls. Mechanical testing was performed using a materials testing machine with torsion test device of up to 500 Nm at speed of 0.18 rpm. Parameters studied included maximum torque, torsional stiffness and energy of absorption. Results. Deep-frozen allografts did not reach 100% strength, achieving only 64% at 6 months. In marked contrast, lyophilized allografts were significantly weaker with only 12% maximum torque strength at 6 months. Lyophilized allografts were significantly weaker than deep-frozen allografts in all observation periods (p<0.05). Conclusion. Deep-frozen allografts did not reach 100% normal strength and were significantly weaker than non-vascularised autografts. Lyophilized allografts were significantly weaker than deep-frozen allografts.Relevance For the reconstruction of massive cortical bone defects, only deep-frozen cortical allografts should be used. Lyophilized allografts are not suitable. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Clinical Biomechanics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/38566
ISSN: 02680033
DOI: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2004.01.010
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