Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/37867
Title: A STUDY ON THE ESTROGEN DEPENDENT CHANGES IN THE STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF OSTEOBLASTS IN VITRO AND IN VIVO
Authors: PADMALOSINI MUTHUKUMARAN
Keywords: Osteoblasts, Estrogen, Elastic modulus, F-actin, Ovariectomy, Atomic Force Microscopy
Issue Date: 23-Jan-2013
Source: PADMALOSINI MUTHUKUMARAN (2013-01-23). A STUDY ON THE ESTROGEN DEPENDENT CHANGES IN THE STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF OSTEOBLASTS IN VITRO AND IN VIVO. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis has been extensively studied on the basis of cellular and molecular effects of estrogen on osteoblasts. This thesis focuses on the mechanical basis of the pathogenesis. The direct in vitro effects of ß-estradiol on the human fetal osteoblasts were observed to be decreased stiffness of the cells through cytoskeletal changes and altered response to fluid shear stress. Using ovariectomized rats, the effect of in vivo loss of estrogen on bone was assessed. At tissue-level, significant deteriorations in trabecular densitometric and micro-architectural properties and cortical geometric, viscoelastic and intrinsic tissue properties were observed. Primary bone cells derived from normal and ovariectomized rats were observed to be significantly different in their mechanical properties and matrix synthesis abilities. Bone cells isolated from ovariectomized rats were found to be more responsive to estrogen treatment than those from normal rats. Overall, estrogen associated mechanistic changes of osteoblasts were substantiated.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/37867
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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