Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/35703
Title: ARTISANS, SUFIS AND COLONIAL ART INSTITUTIONS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY PUNJAB
Authors: HUSSAIN AHMAD KHAN
Keywords: Punjab, Artisans, Colonialism, Sufis, Exhibitions, Museums
Issue Date: 1-Aug-2012
Source: HUSSAIN AHMAD KHAN (2012-08-01). ARTISANS, SUFIS AND COLONIAL ART INSTITUTIONS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY PUNJAB. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Unlike the pre-existing Sufi institutions (khanqah, mela and shrines), colonial art institutions in nineteenth-century Punjab were unable to engage the local artisans, and therefore to shape the local cultural domain. Opacities in Punjabi folktales indicate a deeply embedded historical relationship between Sufis and artisans in Punjab. The construction of shrines in the nineteenth century shows that Sufi beliefs, aiming to assert the Muslim identity, were symbolized in the buildings. With some contestations, Sufi shrines were perceived by artisan-builders and visitors in the same way. The colonial state established various art institutions (schools, exhibitions and museums) to incorporate local artisans into the global economy, revive the local crafts, counter the influences of European imports and introduce Utilitarian ideas and Positivist knowledge in local craft practices. Administrative limitations and unanticipated response of Punjabi artisans significantly altered these objectives. So, the political control does not necessarily entail control over culture.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/35703
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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