Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27860
Title: The Promised Land For Men: The Rising Popularity of Hosts in Contemporary Japanese Society
Authors: YAMAGISHI REIKO
Keywords: hosts, host clubs, commodification of intimacy, emotional labour, hegemonic masculinity, marginal-cultural broker
Issue Date: 26-Feb-2009
Source: YAMAGISHI REIKO (2009-02-26). The Promised Land For Men: The Rising Popularity of Hosts in Contemporary Japanese Society. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Around the end of the 1990s Japan saw the rapid growth of an adult entertainment business called the b host club,b where young Japanese heterosexual men provide young Japanese women, often sex workers themselves, with various kinds of b companionship.b Although the phenomenon was evident throughout red-light districts in Japan, the largest Japanese red-light enclave b KabukichE , Tokyob experienced the most significant growth. With qualitative research methods conducted in KabukichE , this thesis investigated micro (individual), meso (organizational), and macro (socioeconomic) factors behind the growing popularity of the job of hosts. It discusses the structural and perceptional changes of Japanese contemporary masculinitiesb male work, career aspirations, and the qualities of a b legitimateb male worker in the new ageb from an examination of the emerging new masculinity represented by hosts. It is my thesis that the magnification of the Modern Host Club Industry (MHI), and the popularity of the career of hosts, were triggered by the economic recession of the 1990s, which resulted in the deconstruction of the Japanese postwar hegemonic masculinityb the salaryman.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27860
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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