Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27630
Title: Exploration of the functional significance of mig-2 in human cancer cell susceptibility to cytotoxic agents and cell growth control: A pilot study
Authors: LIU KUN
Keywords: mig-2, cell susceptibility, cell proliferation, apoptosis, gene expression, IE genes
Issue Date: 20-Aug-2004
Source: LIU KUN (2004-08-20). Exploration of the functional significance of mig-2 in human cancer cell susceptibility to cytotoxic agents and cell growth control: A pilot study. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Mitogen inducible gene-2 (mig-2) was identified in 1994 as an immediate early (IE) gene in mitogen-mediated signal transduction in human fibroblast. However, its functions remained uncharacterized. In previous investigations we revealed a 60% homology between mig-2 and a novel gene in mouse, which was capable of reversing the acquired drug resistance in murine tumor cells against anticancer drugs. Two recent publications have showed the association with mig-2 gene in cell shape modulation and tumorigenesis. The present study aims to characterize mig-2 and explore potential functions of mig-2 gene in human cancer cell lines. HT-29 cell line, a naturally mig-2-null cell line was chosen to be transfected both transiently and stably to investigate mig-2 genea??s functions. Our data showed that expression of mig-2 inhibits cell proliferation, induces apoptosis in HT-29 but does not enhance cell sensitivity to anticancer reagents. In conclusion, mig-2 may play an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation in human cancer cells and the underlying mechanism needs further investigation.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27630
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Open)

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