Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresrev.2006.08.002
Title: BrdU immunohistochemistry for studying adult neurogenesis: Paradigms, pitfalls, limitations, and validation
Authors: Taupin, P. 
Keywords: Abortive cell cycle reentry
Cell cycle
DNA synthesis
Gene duplication
Mutagen
Thymidine analog
Issue Date: 2007
Citation: Taupin, P. (2007). BrdU immunohistochemistry for studying adult neurogenesis: Paradigms, pitfalls, limitations, and validation. Brain Research Reviews 53 (1) : 198-214. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresrev.2006.08.002
Abstract: Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) is a thymidine analog that incorporates DNA of dividing cells during the S-phase of the cell cycle. As such, BrdU is used for birth dating and monitoring cell proliferation. BrdU immunohistochemistry has been instrumental for the study of the development of the nervous system, and to confirm that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain, including in human. However, the use of BrdU for studying neurogenesis is not without pitfalls and limitations. BrdU is a toxic and mutagenic substance. It triggers cell death, the formation of teratomas, alters DNA stability, lengthens the cell cycle, and has mitogenic, transcriptional and translational effects on cells that incorporate it. All of which have profound consequences on neurogenesis. BrdU is not a marker of the S-phase of the cell cycle. As a thymidine analog, it is a marker of DNA synthesis. Therefore, studying neurogenesis with BrdU requires distinguishing cell proliferation and neurogenesis from other events involving DNA synthesis, like DNA repair, abortive cell cycle reentry and gene duplication. BrdU labeling is currently the most used technique for studying adult neurogenesis in situ. However in many instances, appropriate controls have been overlooked and events reported as the generation of new neuronal cells in the adult brain misinterpreted, which makes BrdU labeling one of the most misused techniques in neuroscience. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Brain Research Reviews
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/26063
ISSN: 01650173
DOI: 10.1016/j.brainresrev.2006.08.002
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