Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2009.03.026
Title: Repeated application of incremental landing impact loads to intact knee joints induces anterior cruciate ligament failure and tibiofemoral cartilage deformation and damage: A preliminary cadaveric investigation
Authors: Yeow, C.H.
Goh, J.C.H. 
Ng, K.S. 
Lee, P.V.S.
Cheong, C.H.
Keywords: Anterior cruciate ligament
Cartilage damage
Failure mechanism
Knee joint
Landing impact load
Issue Date: 2009
Source: Yeow, C.H., Goh, J.C.H., Ng, K.S., Lee, P.V.S., Cheong, C.H. (2009). Repeated application of incremental landing impact loads to intact knee joints induces anterior cruciate ligament failure and tibiofemoral cartilage deformation and damage: A preliminary cadaveric investigation. Journal of Biomechanics 42 (8) : 972-981. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2009.03.026
Abstract: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a major problem worldwide and prevails during high-impact activities. It is not well-understood how the extent and distribution of cartilage damage will arise from repetitive landing impact loads that can lead to ACL failure. This study seeks to investigate the sole effect of repetitive incremental landing impact loads on the induction of ACL failure, and extent and distribution of tibiofemoral cartilage damage in cadaveric knees. Five cadaveric knees were mounted onto a material testing system at 70° flexion to simulate landing posture. A motion-capture system was used to track rotational and translational motions of the tibia and femur, respectively. Each specimen was compressed at a single 10 Hz haversine to simulate landing impact. The compression trial was successively repeated with increasing actuator displacement till a significant compressive force drop was observed. All specimens underwent ACL failure, which was confirmed via magnetic resonance scans and dissection. Volume analysis, thickness measurement and histological techniques were employed to assess cartilage lesion status. For each specimen, the highest peak compressive force (1.9-7.8 kN) was at the final trial in which ACL failure occurred; corresponding posterior femoral displacement (7.6-18.0 mm) and internal tibial rotation (0.6°-4.7°) were observed. Significant compressive force drop (79.8-90.9%) was noted upon ACL failure. Considerable cartilage deformation and damage were found in exterior, posterior and interior femoral regions with substantial volume reduction in lateral compartments. Repeated application of incremental landing impact loads can induce both ACL failure and cartilage damage, which may accelerate the risk of developing osteoarthritis. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd.
Source Title: Journal of Biomechanics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/25338
ISSN: 00219290
DOI: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2009.03.026
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