Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbamem.2005.08.005
Title: Investigation of a novel artificial antimicrobial peptide by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: An amphipathic cationic pattern is sufficient for selective binding to bacterial type membranes and antimicrobial activity
Authors: Yu, L.
Wohland, T. 
Jeak, L.D. 
Ho, B. 
Keywords: Antimicrobial peptide
Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy
Issue Date: 2005
Source: Yu, L., Wohland, T., Jeak, L.D., Ho, B. (2005). Investigation of a novel artificial antimicrobial peptide by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: An amphipathic cationic pattern is sufficient for selective binding to bacterial type membranes and antimicrobial activity. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes 1716 (1) : 29-39. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbamem.2005.08.005
Abstract: Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is used to study the interaction of a recently designed antimicrobial peptide, called V4, with LPS and lipids of varying head and tail groups. V4 is designed based on a known amphipathic cationic pattern BHPHB (B: basic; H: hydrophobic; P: polar residue, respectively) and shows a good combination of high antimicrobial activity, low cytotoxic activity and low hemolytic activity. It is shown that V4 has high binding affinity for LPS, which is the major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and shows selectivity for negatively charged lipids in contrast to zwitterionic lipids at a low peptide/lipid ratio. At high peptide/lipid ratio, V4 can permeabilize vesicles composed of negatively charged lipids and eventually cause vesicle fusion. The identification of the amphipathic cationic pattern as the mediator of selectivity and antimicrobial activity could be a first step in the rational design of better antimicrobial peptides. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/24849
ISSN: 00052736
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbamem.2005.08.005
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