Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2004.03.010
Title: Reference and blending in a computer role-playing game
Authors: Tea, A.J.H. 
Lee, B.P.H. 
Keywords: Blending
Computer
Pronoun
Reference
Role-play
Issue Date: 2004
Source: Tea, A.J.H.,Lee, B.P.H. (2004). Reference and blending in a computer role-playing game. Journal of Pragmatics 36 (9) : 1609-1633. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2004.03.010
Abstract: In this paper, we give an account of reference and blending in the computer role-playing game (CRPG) Icewind Dale II in light of the theories of mental spaces and conceptual integration networks [G. Fauconnier, M. Turner, The Way We Think: Conceptual Blending and the Mind's Hidden Complexities, Basic Books, New York, 2002]. Focusing on the behaviour of the pronominals "me" and "you", we demonstrate firstly, that the traditional accounts fail to adequately explain pronominal referential ambiguity in CRPG discourse fragments. In view of this, we argue for a more efficacious approach (grounded in mental spaces and conceptual integration networks) which shows a blending of the player and the character entities over the computer-mediated role-playing platform. Secondly, we note that the complex lattice of conceptual integration networks from which blending is observed facilitates immersiveness in computer role-playing and, more significantly, gives rise to an understanding of pronominal reference where identity is pluralised, distributed and dynamic. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Journal of Pragmatics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/23370
ISSN: 03782166
DOI: 10.1016/j.pragma.2004.03.010
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