Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/23195
Title: Effect of radiation on the sensori-neural auditory system and the clinical implications
Authors: LOW WONG KEIN, CHRISTOPHER
Keywords: deafness, radiotherapy, chemo-radiotherapy, hair cells, apoptosis, anti-oxidant
Issue Date: 30-May-2007
Source: LOW WONG KEIN, CHRISTOPHER (2007-05-30). Effect of radiation on the sensori-neural auditory system and the clinical implications. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: A prospective study on patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated by radiotherapy was conducted. Although the auditory pathways received relatively high radiation doses, the retro-cochlear pathways as measured by brainstem evoked response audiometry, remained functionally intact even up to 4 years after radiation. A single-blinded randomized study on nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy alone and with chemo-radiation therapy was carried out over a 2-year period. It revealed that combined therapy resulted in synergistic ototoxicity, particularly for high frequency sounds in the speech range. In the OC-k3 cochlear cell line, radiation-induced apoptosis was documented by flow cytometry and TUNEL assay. Post-irradiation effects were further studied by microarray analysis, Western blotting and DCFDA detection of ROS. Radiation-induced apoptosis was observed to occur in a dose-dependant and ROS-related fashion with p53 possibly playing a major role. The anti-oxidant L-N-Acetylcysteine was demonstrated to protect the cell line against radiation-induced apoptosis.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/23195
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