Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/0031-9384(91)90267-R
Title: The effects of occipital ablation on a conditioned visual avoidance learning task in young and old rats
Authors: Chee, S.-J. 
Isaac, W.
Keywords: Age
Avoidance
Learning
Occipital ablation
Postoperative interval
Rats
Visual
Issue Date: 1991
Source: Chee, S.-J.,Isaac, W. (1991). The effects of occipital ablation on a conditioned visual avoidance learning task in young and old rats. Physiology and Behavior 49 (3) : 481-484. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/0031-9384(91)90267-R
Abstract: Previous data indicate that learning of a conditioned visual avoidance task following simultaneous complete bilateral occipital ablations is affected by the age of the organism as well as the postoperative recovery period. The present study investigated the performance of the avoidance task, following complete occipital ablations, in young and older rats given two different recovery intervals. Young rats given 10 days to recover performed more poorly than the young control animals; given 20 days to recover, young rats performed comparable to controls. Older rats given 10 days to recover performed significantly better than the controls; given 20 days to recover, older rats did not show a decrease in performance. The present finding is consistent with previous data which show that the occipital cortex exerted an inhibitory effect on the learning ability of the avoidance task in older rats, which, upon removal, enhanced the performance of these rats on the task.
Source Title: Physiology and Behavior
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/22528
ISSN: 00319384
DOI: 10.1016/0031-9384(91)90267-R
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

1
checked on Dec 13, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

1
checked on Oct 31, 2017

Page view(s)

120
checked on Dec 9, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.