Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jml.2009.07.001
Title: Individual differences in the joint effects of semantic priming and word frequency revealed by RT distributional analyses: The role of lexical integrity
Authors: Yap, M.J. 
Tse, C.-S.
Balota, D.A.
Keywords: Ex-Gaussian analyses
Individual differences
Lexical decision
Lexical integrity
Lexical quality
RT distributional analyses
Semantic priming
Visual word recognition
Issue Date: 2009
Source: Yap, M.J.,Tse, C.-S.,Balota, D.A. (2009). Individual differences in the joint effects of semantic priming and word frequency revealed by RT distributional analyses: The role of lexical integrity. Journal of Memory and Language 61 (3) : 303-325. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jml.2009.07.001
Abstract: Word frequency and semantic priming effects are among the most robust effects in visual word recognition, and it has been generally assumed that these two variables produce interactive effects in lexical decision performance, with larger priming effects for low-frequency targets. The results from four lexical decision experiments indicate that the joint effects of semantic priming and word frequency are critically dependent upon differences in the vocabulary knowledge of the participants. Specifically, across two Universities, additive effects of the two variables were observed in means, and in RT distributional analyses, in participants with more vocabulary knowledge, while interactive effects were observed in participants with less vocabulary knowledge. These results are discussed with reference to [Borowsky, R., & Besner, D. (1993). Visual word recognition: A multistage activation model. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 19, 813-840] multistage account and [Plaut, D. C., & Booth, J. R. (2000). Individual and developmental differences in semantic priming: Empirical and computational support for a single-mechanism account of lexical processing. Psychological Review, 107, 786-823] single-mechanism model. In general, the findings are also consistent with a flexible lexical processing system that optimizes performance based on processing fluency and task demands. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Journal of Memory and Language
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/22234
ISSN: 0749596X
DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2009.07.001
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