Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/22130
Title: Serotonin and serotonin receptors in neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation
Authors: TAN CHEE KUAN, FRANCIS
Keywords: neural stem and progenitor cells, proliferation, 5-HT, serotonin receptors, tryptophan hydroxylase, vitrification
Issue Date: 28-Jan-2010
Source: TAN CHEE KUAN, FRANCIS (2010-01-28). Serotonin and serotonin receptors in neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter that is involved in pathological condition of depression which treatment using selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) antidepressants are found to increase neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation. This study found that serotonergic fibres are found at the neurogenic regions of the brain and the NSPCs are found to express a host of 5HT receptors. Previous reports suggested that 5-HTR1A receptor to be the main receptor subtype involved in antidepressant-induced increase in NSPC proliferation. However, in this study, it was found that NSPC proliferation may be induced by 5-HT7 rather than 5-HT1A receptor. NSPCs were also found to express functional 5-HT3A and 5HT3B receptors and treatment with 5-HT3 receptor selective antagonists increased NSPC proliferation which supports studies showing antidepressants may increase NSPC proliferation 5-HT3 receptors blockade. TPH1 and TPH2 were expressed by NSPCs and TPH1 expression was NSPC specific. TPH1 knockout was found to impair NSPC proliferation in vivo. To assist research, a method of cryopreservation of cultured NSPCs through serum and protein-free vitrification had also been optimized.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/22130
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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