Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/18414
Title: Forging a Regional Security Community: A Study of the Driving Forces behind ASEAN and East Asian Regionalism
Authors: TEO KAH BENG
Keywords: security community, ASEAN, East Asia, Regionalism, Driving Forces
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2010
Source: TEO KAH BENG (2010-02-24). Forging a Regional Security Community: A Study of the Driving Forces behind ASEAN and East Asian Regionalism. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Contrary to a claim by constructivist scholars, post-Cold War ASEAN has not become integrated into a security community. These scholars argue that the peaceful norms of the `ASEAN Way¿ of cooperative security have led to a common ASEAN identity. ASEAN is not yet a regional security community because many of its members, divided by race and religion, different levels of economic development and political systems, are still engaged in the fragile process of establishing nation-states. They also lack liberal-democratic values, are stuck with nationalistic rather than regional mindsets, and regional affinity and trust remain highly problematic. Over the past two decades, ASEAN has made progress in promoting regional economic cooperation, but little in the way of forging closer regional political integration. The ASEAN Way has played, by default, a constructive role in promoting Northeast Asian regionalism. But the contributions of the ASEAN Way to the evolving East Asian security order should not be exaggerated. It is only one of several factors that are shaping the dynamics of Northeast Asian regionalism. These important determinants highlight the relevance of state-centric actors: the rise of China, Japan¿s quest for `normal¿ country status, leadership role of a middle power like South Korea, and growing US support for inclusive East Asian regionalism. Overall, the statist pattern of East Asian regionalism is driven by the fact that they remain basically Westphalian states, obsessed with the protection of their national sovereignty.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/18414
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