Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/17549
Title: A Mechanism-based Approach - Void Growth and Coalescence in Polymeric Adhesive Joints
Authors: CHEW HUCK BENG
Keywords: Void growth; Vapor pressure; Residual stress; Pressure-sensitivity; Plastic dilatancy; Polymers
Issue Date: 17-Oct-2007
Source: CHEW HUCK BENG (2007-10-17). A Mechanism-based Approach - Void Growth and Coalescence in Polymeric Adhesive Joints. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Polymeric adhesives sandwiched between two elastic substrates are commonly found in multi-layers and IC packages. Their structural integrity under severe environmental conditions dictates design. In this thesis, mechanism-based failure models are employed to obtain insights into the mechanics and mechanisms of failure in polymeric adhesive joints. The research scope is two-fold: Part I examines how variations in temperature and moisture degrade mechanical properties of polymeric adhesives, and activate mechanisms which in turn lead to cracking and failure; Part II focuses on the void growth and interaction in pressure-sensitive polymers and adhesives. Results show that residual stress and vapor pressure accelerate voiding activity and growth of the damage zone, resulting in brittle-like adhesive failure. The effects of vapor pressure on joint toughness are particularly severe under mode II dominant loading. The study also suggests that pressure-sensitive yielding increases void interaction effects. The latter promotes synergistic cooperative void growth, intensifying adhesive damage levels and increasing its spatial extent several folds.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/17549
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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