Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/17101
Title: Microbiologically induced corrosion of AISI 304 stainless steel by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in artificial seawater
Authors: NGUYEN THI MY PHUC
Keywords: Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC); Atomic force microscopy (AFM); Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS); EIS modeling; biofilm;
Issue Date: 9-Jun-2005
Source: NGUYEN THI MY PHUC (2005-06-09). Microbiologically induced corrosion of AISI 304 stainless steel by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in artificial seawater. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The study investigated the microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) of AISI 304 stainless steel (SS) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774, in batch systems of modified artificial seawater using AFM, EIS, SEM, EDX, and XPS. After 14 days of immersion, the SRB induced pits and cracks on the SS surface (AFM analysis); decreased the polarization resistance (Rp) in comparison to control samples (EIS analysis); modified the near surface environment of the SS and caused the dissolution of the oxide layer on the SS surface (XPS analysis). Equivalent circuit models were also proposed to fit the corrosion processes, and provided electrochemical information on the differences between the abiotic and biotic systems. The findings showed increase in pit depth and decrease in Rp with time over 56 days. Furthermore, Rp decreased with elevated temperatures, but the highest mean pit depth occurred at the optimal temperature of SRB growth at 37oC. Additionally, welding of the SS enhanced bacterial adhesion, while polishing achieved the opposite effect. EIS and Potentiodynamic Scan (PDS) revealed that polishing of the SS reduced the corrosion rate of the metal surface.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/17101
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Open)

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01-Tittle pages.pdf14.79 kBAdobe PDF

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02-Acknowledgements.pdf11.02 kBAdobe PDF

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03-Table of contents.pdf46.11 kBAdobe PDF

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04-Summary.pdf17.68 kBAdobe PDF

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05-Nomenclature.pdf17.27 kBAdobe PDF

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06-List of table.pdf19.11 kBAdobe PDF

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07-List of figures.pdf57.93 kBAdobe PDF

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08-Chapter 1-Introduction.pdf31.58 kBAdobe PDF

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09-Chapter 2-Literature review.pdf489.84 kBAdobe PDF

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10-CHAPTER 3-Materials and methods.pdf146.45 kBAdobe PDF

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11-CHAPTER 4-Results and discussion.pdf10.82 MBAdobe PDF

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12-CHAPTER 5-Conclusions and recommendations.pdf47.7 kBAdobe PDF

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13-REFERENCES.pdf77.42 kBAdobe PDF

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14-Appendices.pdf241.74 kBAdobe PDF

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