Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/16723
Title: Memory, Reconciliation and Chosen Traumas: the Political Psychology of the Chinese State, Media and Public on Sino-Japanese Relations
Authors: GAO DEXIANG
Keywords: Sino-Japanese Relations, Memory, Reconciliation, Chosen Traumas, Political Psychology, Chinese Nationalism
Issue Date: 25-Feb-2009
Source: GAO DEXIANG (2009-02-25). Memory, Reconciliation and Chosen Traumas: the Political Psychology of the Chinese State, Media and Public on Sino-Japanese Relations. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Since 1972 when China and Japan established their formal diplomatic relationship, considerable ruptures and disputes have been haunting the reconciliation between these two countries. The increasing complexity of the differences between the Chinese state and public in dealing with Sino-Japanese relations indicates that the historical memory and how people perceive and respond to memory has become a crucial factor impeding the reconciliation. Notwithstanding the ideological and victory narrative that once suppressed the traumatic memory, the inherent suspicion of Japan still largely outweighs any positive attitude. Nevertheless, the prevailing negative attitude of the Chinese public is essentially the result of state narrative even if the Chinese government has actually been making salient efforts to ameliorate the relationship with Japan. Thus the central factor for the Chinese is chosen traumas, a mental representation transmitted at a trans-generational level of past historical events, varying with the three actors of state, media and public.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/16723
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