Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/16428
Title: Participation in Jihad as a politico-religious form of collective action
Authors: DICKY SOFJAN
Keywords: Participation, collective action, islam, jihad
Issue Date: 28-Mar-2006
Source: DICKY SOFJAN (2006-03-28). Participation in Jihad as a politico-religious form of collective action. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Firmly embedded in the Islamic thought, practice and ethos, jihad (colloquially, a??Islamic holy wara??) is far from being an anachronism. Both statesmen and scholars need to know on what bases Muslims decide whether or not to participate in jihad. Is there some form of logic behind the decision to participate? Is the decision based on perceived grievance, culture, personal and collective identity, or religious expression? Can socioeconomic status (SES) indicators tell us something about the profiles of the jihad participants and its prospective doers? How crucial is religiosity in determining the Muslimsa?? level of willingness to participate in jihad?This study sets out to examine Muslim participation in jihad as a politico-religious form of collective action. It delves into the question of why some Muslims participate in jihad, while others do not. Here, participation is measured against the level of willingness on the part of Muslims to participate in jihad. The main independent variable is religiosity, divided into three components: Knowledge of Islam, ritual practices and religious affection. From these components, 12 measures of Islamic religiosity were incorporated into an individual level survey, which employed direct, face-to-face interview technique involving around 1000 Muslims on the streets of Indonesia and Iran. The approach employed in this study is essentially a combination between methodological individualism and multisubjective interpretation.Datasets were analyzed both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. The qualitative aspect of the study derives from library research and in-depth open-ended interviews with Muslim leaders, activists and jihad participants. Some of the intriguing conversations held with the Muslim respondents were also duly incorporated. As for the quantitative part, descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, correlations, crosstabulations and binary logistics regression were used sparingly.From the theoretical perspective, while empirical studies on political participation have been overly reliant on the SES model (Leighley 1995), collective action theories have almost always been based on the Olsonian logic (1965, 1971). This study hypothesizes that religiosity significantly determines the variation in the willingness on the part of Muslims to participate in politico-religious forms of collective action. Empirical findings suggest that the level of religiosity matters when Muslims decide whether or not to participate in jihad. Moreover, survey data reveals that religious affectiona??denoting identity, affinity, solidarity and sense of attachment to the universal Muslim body politic or the ummaha??mostly and significantly determines the level of Muslim participation in jihad. Conclusively, much of participation is determined not by rational instrumentalism but rather the participanta??s expressive choice.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/16428
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