Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/15846
Title: Hot-carrier mechanisms in advanced NMOS transistors
Authors: PHUA WEE HONG, TIMOTHY
Keywords: reliability hot-carrier nmosfet high-energy-tail electron self-heating
Issue Date: 28-Apr-2009
Source: PHUA WEE HONG, TIMOTHY (2009-04-28). Hot-carrier mechanisms in advanced NMOS transistors. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: In this thesis, the role of High-Energy Tail (HET) electrons in channel hot-electron induced degradation of future NMOS transistor is studied. These electrons are mainly responsible for the shift in the worst-case hot-carrier degradation in the bulk-Si transistor. Further analysis revealed that they played a dominant role in the interface state generation and lifetime extrapolation. For transistors built on poor thermal conductivity substrates such as strained-Si/SiGe, the role of HET electrons in hot-electron induced degradation cannot be ignored. It was found that severe interface damage is created in the channel of the strained-Si/SiGe transistor at very short stress time. This phenomenon is explained by a proposed mechanism relating the increase of HET through self-heating effect.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/15846
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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