Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/15749
Title: Exit from mitosis triggers Chs2p transport from the ER to mother-daughter neck via the secretory pathway in budding yeast.
Authors: ZHANG GANG
Keywords: CHS2, secretory pathway, mitotic kinase
Issue Date: 19-Jan-2007
Source: ZHANG GANG (2007-01-19). Exit from mitosis triggers Chs2p transport from the ER to mother-daughter neck via the secretory pathway in budding yeast.. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: In this study, the timely localization of Chs2p to the neck and the relationship with MEN (mitotic exit network) components and mitotic kinase were examined. We found the appearance of Chs2p at the neck was closely correlated with a decrease of mitotic kinase. Mitotic exit, not single MEN components such as Cdc15p, was required for the translocation of Chs2p to the neck. At metaphase, the induction of Sic1p, an inhibitor of the mitotic kinase, caused a decrease in the mitotic kinase activity that could trigger the premature localization of Chs2p at the neck. Interestingly, we found Chs2p to be restrained at ER during metaphase, when mitotic kinase activity was high. In temperature-sensitive mutants of the COP II secretory pathway such as sec12-4, sec18-1 and sec2-59, Chs2p failed to translocate to the neck even when mitotic kinase was inactivated. This indicated that the translocation of Chs2p to the neck was via the COPII-mediated secretory pathway. More importantly, the transport of Chs2p out of the ER depended upon mitotic kinase inactivation. The timely export of Chs2p from the ER during mitotic exit ensures that septum formation will occur only after the completion of mitotic events.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/15749
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