Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/15271
Title: Generation of supramolecular diversity through self-assembly of multi-dimensional building blocks
Authors: AKHILA JAYARAMAN
Keywords: Self-assembly, Organogels, Crystal engineering, Pseudopolymorphism, C3 polyphenol,Supramolecular, Hydroxylated polymers, Biomimetic studies
Issue Date: 27-Apr-2006
Source: AKHILA JAYARAMAN (2006-04-27). Generation of supramolecular diversity through self-assembly of multi-dimensional building blocks. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The science of supramolecular chemistry provides a useful tool in constructing complex structures from simple components for the development of functional materials. The dimensionality, molecular structure, symmetry and the presence of multifunctional groups influences the self-assembly of small molecules and polymers in the solid/solution state. This thesis is aimed towards exploiting the attributes of non-covalent interactions, particularly H-bonded interactions to design and synthesize 2D and 3D building blocks for fundamental studies and potential applications. A series of newly synthesized 2D oligobisamide based organogelators self-assembled into 3D network structures and exhibited liquid crystalline properties. The symmetry and the balance of molecular forces influenced the organogelation in the diamides. The crystal structure of V-shaped precursor acids to the bisamides revealed that they were pseudopolymorphic in nature. Molecular complexes derived from 3D polyphenols and simple diamines assembled into interesting H-bonded supramolecular architectures in the solid state. Polymethacrylates with multiple hydroxyl groups formed monolayers at the air-water interface and showed good film forming properties. One of the hydroxylated polymers templates directed the formation of amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate thin films. The diversity that is observed in the supramolecular structures generated from the building blocks described in the thesis is attributed to the symmetry, molecular components and hydrogen bonding abilities of the functional groups.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/15271
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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Summary.pdf114.65 kBAdobe PDF

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Abbreviations.pdf138.36 kBAdobe PDF

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Acknowledgement.pdf54.24 kBAdobe PDF

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Title Page.pdf48.09 kBAdobe PDF

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