Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147818
Title: EFFECTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL HIERARCHY ON PERCEPTIONS OF AND REACTIONS TO WORKPLACE DEVIANCE
Authors: NG ZI SHAN
Issue Date: 2013
Citation: NG ZI SHAN (2013). EFFECTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL HIERARCHY ON PERCEPTIONS OF AND REACTIONS TO WORKPLACE DEVIANCE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Although workplace deviance has been present in organizations for centuries, it was not till recently that it started receiving greater attention in the field of research. The consequences of negative workplace deviance can be devastating for organizations in both financial and nonfinancial terms. Beyond the antecedents and consequences of workplace deviance, the perceptions of and reactions to workplace deviance are also significant as the level of interdependence and hence interaction increases within organizations. This study takes a closer look at how the relative organizational hierarchical positions of perpetrators and witnesses affect the experience of workplace deviance. The perceptions and reactions of the witness are studied, namely (i) perceptions of seriousness, (ii) intensity of anger, (iii) intensity of disgust, (iv) reduction in level of trust, (v) behavioral reactions. From the sample of 320 survey respondents, the status differences resulting from different relative positions in the organizational hierarchy had no significant effect on the perceptions of and reactions to workplace deviance. Interestingly, however, we found that the witness’ own organizational rank might influence his experience of workplace deviance and recommend that this finding can be further examined in future research.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147818
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
b33101930.pdf3.53 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

4
checked on Oct 4, 2018

Download(s)

2
checked on Oct 4, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.