Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147510
Title: PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF NON-PROFITS IN SINGAPORE: HOW AT-RISK YOUTH AND ELDERCARE NON-PROFITS MEASURE AND MANAGE PERFORMANCE
Authors: KWAN JIN YAO
Issue Date: 2016
Citation: KWAN JIN YAO (2016). PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF NON-PROFITS IN SINGAPORE: HOW AT-RISK YOUTH AND ELDERCARE NON-PROFITS MEASURE AND MANAGE PERFORMANCE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Although non-profit organisations (NPOs) in Singapore – unlike their counterparts in the for-profit industries – cannot necessarily measure their value or success through financial indicators per se, many of these organisations have begun to use, or are already using, various metrics to determine their performance and the impact they may have created. In this vein, performance measurement and management (PMM) may have gained traction for NPOs in the country, but how common is its employment, how has it been operationalised, and to what extent has PMM been useful for them? After all, it has been contended that PMM can be used to ascertain the legitimacy, accountability, and effectiveness of an organisation. Furthermore, stakeholders – such as the funders, the government, and even the public-at-large – are also clamouring for more evidence of the performance and impact of NPOs. PMM can therefore, in this regard, yield valuable information about the organisations. In response to the dearth of academic research on how non-profits in Singapore may be using PMM, this dissertation – through 16 semi-structured, first-hand interviews with NPOs, coupled with brief analyses of annual reports and financial statements – is an exploratory study. Through a grounded theory approach, it was determined that NPOs in Singapore are not only familiar with PMM, but have also adopted practices to improve programmes and services. However, while the non-profits, guided by their missions and visions, have no trouble specifying their inputs, programmes, outputs, and outcomes, doing the same for long-term outcomes and impact has been more complicated. As such, insights from the NPOs will be detailed and consolidated across theoretical propositions, before relevant policy recommendations are mooted for relevant stakeholders, that is: the NPOs, funders and funding agencies, the government of Singapore, as well as the public-at-large.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147510
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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