Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147478
Title: PERCEPTIONS AND EFFECTS OF A BABYFACE ON NEGOTIATION PREPARATIONS
Authors: ERWIN TEO HSIEN WEI
Issue Date: 2009
Citation: ERWIN TEO HSIEN WEI (2009). PERCEPTIONS AND EFFECTS OF A BABYFACE ON NEGOTIATION PREPARATIONS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Babyfaceness has been shown to affect perceptions of personality traits at first glance, without any form of interaction. This has resulted in babyfaced individuals being viewed as more naïve, physically weaker and more submissive among others. These differences in perception of characteristics suggest there should be differences in the way that babyfaced individuals are approached in the opening phases of a negotiation, as there have already been judgments made. In this 3 part study, we wanted to see how babyfaced individuals differ in traits that are directly associated with negotiations. We used the Big 5 personality model as a starting point as Extraversion has been shown to affect negotiation outcomes. We also wanted to see if perception differences extended to attribution differences in both positive and negative events, and finally, we wanted to see if these perceptions and attributions affect actual negotiation preparations. Our results suggest babyfaced individuals are viewed to be greater teamplayers and more extraverted when compared to mature individuals. When accused of a bad event, abyfaced individuals tend to receive less personal attribution, and external observers tend to attribute greater responsibility or blame to the situation. When maturefaced individuals get credited with a good event, external observers tend to attribute responsibility of the good deed to the situation rather than the maturefaced person. These findings lead us to infer that babyfaced individuals would do well in integrative negotiations, as their visually perceived team-orientated nature would be reciprocated by their counterparties. They would do badly in distributive negotiations, given that prior studies have found Extraversion to be detrimental in distributive negotiations. This idea is partially supported by results from our 3rd study, which finds that babyfaced individuals are approached with a more competitive mindset in a distributive negotiation situation, while there seems to be no difference in ultimatum game offers.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147478
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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