Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147167
Title: PICTURE COMPLETION AND RESTING-STATE FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY IN BRIEF PSYCHOTIC DISORDER AND SCHIZOPHRENIA
Authors: ARIEL LIN YOUJIN
Keywords: functional connectivity, brief psychotic disorder, schizophrenia
Issue Date: 13-Apr-2018
Citation: ARIEL LIN YOUJIN (2018-04-13). PICTURE COMPLETION AND RESTING-STATE FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY IN BRIEF PSYCHOTIC DISORDER AND SCHIZOPHRENIA. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Visual perception and cognitive deficits are key features of psychotic spectrum disorders. In this study, we examine performance in a higher-order visual processing task, Picture Completion (PC), in 2 psychotic spectrum disorders, Brief Psychotic Disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia, and utilised resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine resting-state functional connectivity networks of interest (dorsal stream, dorsal attention networks, and frontoparietal networks) and their association to PC. Participants were 29 healthy controls, 20 BPD subjects and 20 schizophrenia subjects. PC performances were found to be graded to psychotic severity, with impaired performance in BPD, and even more impaired performance in schizophrenia relative to healthy controls. Additionally, group differences were found for resting-state functional connectivity between the dorsal attention networks and the transverse, inferior, and superior temporal gyri, with abnormal functional connectivity observed in schizophrenia relative to healthy controls, and a similar trend in BPD subjects. The strength of these functional connectivity associations correlated with PC performance. Lastly, path analysis supported a top-down model of visual processing, implicating dorsal attention networks in PC performance in healthy controls and BPD, but not schizophrenia. Larger prospective studies of functional networks in psychotic spectrum disorders, especially BPD, which remains under-investigated, are required to provide further insight on neural mechanisms underlying cognitive and visual processing deficits.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147167
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