Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147148
Title: THE ROLE OF EMOTION RECOGNITION IN BODY DYSMORPHIC CONCERNS
Authors: HO ZI YUN DAYNA
Keywords: Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Body dysmorphic concerns, emotion recognition, facial expression
Issue Date: 13-Apr-2018
Citation: HO ZI YUN DAYNA (2018-04-13). THE ROLE OF EMOTION RECOGNITION IN BODY DYSMORPHIC CONCERNS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Cognitive behavioural theories have suggested the importance of selective attention in the interpretation of facial expressions in patients with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). Previous research has shown that BDD sufferers have emotion recognition deficits, of which they misinterpret “neutral” faces as “angry” or “disgusted” (Buhlmann, Etcoff & Wilhelm, 2006). As Body Dysmorphic Concerns (BDC) lie on a spectrum, this study examined if individuals with high levels of BDC misinterpreted more facial expressions as threatening (e.g. angry or disgusted) than individuals with low BDC. One hundred and thirty nine participants (31 males) were recruited from the National University of Singapore, Facebook and Twitter for this cross-sectional study. Participants completed measures assessing BDD, appearance concerns, depression and facial emotion recognition through an online survey. Multiple regression analyses revealed that high BDC participants misinterpreted significantly more faces as “angry” and “disgusted” than those with low BDC, but only when told to imagine that the person in the image was looking at them (self-referent scenario). The most commonly cited appearance concern is “Skin on face”. These findings add to the current literature on BDC in an Asian setting. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147148
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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