Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147140
Title: THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN’S SELF-BENEFITING LYING BEHAVIOUR: WHEN DO KIDS START TO LIE FOR PERSONAL GAIN?
Authors: VALERIE NG YONG WEI
Keywords: children, deception, theory of mind, executive functioning, bilingualism
Issue Date: 13-Apr-2018
Citation: VALERIE NG YONG WEI (2018-04-13). THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN’S SELF-BENEFITING LYING BEHAVIOUR: WHEN DO KIDS START TO LIE FOR PERSONAL GAIN?. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Deceptive behaviour in young children has received increasing attention in recent years for its theoretical implications in understanding children’s social-cognitive development, as well as its practical relevance to the clinical, educational, and legal field. However, little is known about the development of self-benefiting lying behaviour in terms of its developmental trajectory and cognitive correlates. The present study aims to fill the gap by situating children aged 3 to 6 years old in a zero-sum game where the child must lie to their opponent to obtain a desirable reward. We found that majority of 3 year-olds were able to lie spontaneously; as the game progressed, more children lied. Furthermore, results showed that children’s theory of mind understanding, particularly in the domain of knowledge access, together with inhibitory control, and language abilities had a significant positive correlation with the frequency of the child’s self-benefiting lying behaviour. The present results, taken together with existing literature, suggests that lying for personal benefits emerges early in life. The act of lying is facilitated by the development of children's specific cognitive abilities in the domains of theory of mind understanding, executive functioning, and language abilities.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147140
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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