Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147024
Title: PRELIMINARY EFFECTS OF USING MOBILE GAMES TO REDUCE PERIOPERATIVE ANXIETY AND POSTOPERATIVE PAIN IN CHILDREN UNDERGOING ELECTIVE SURGERY: A MIXED METHODS STUDY
Authors: WANG GA GI
Keywords: mobile games, preoperative anxiety, postoperative pain, children
Issue Date: 21-Jun-2018
Citation: WANG GA GI (2018-06-21). PRELIMINARY EFFECTS OF USING MOBILE GAMES TO REDUCE PERIOPERATIVE ANXIETY AND POSTOPERATIVE PAIN IN CHILDREN UNDERGOING ELECTIVE SURGERY: A MIXED METHODS STUDY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Background: Preoperative anxiety poses many negative effects such as increased postoperative pain. Technological vehicles such as smartphones can be used to educate or as a distraction to reduce preoperative anxiety. Current literature has yet to establish the effectiveness of mobile games to reduce preoperative anxiety and postoperative pain among children about to undergo elective day surgery in Singapore. Aims: To evaluate the preliminary effects of three self-developed mobile games on reducing pre- and postoperative anxiety, and postoperative pain among children undergoing day surgery. Methods: A pilot randomised controlled trial was conducted. A total of 40 children between the age of 8 to 12 were randomised to either the intervention group or routine care group. The anxiety was measured by modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS) and the State Anxiety Scale for Children (SAS-C). Postoperative pain was measured by the Numerical Rating Scale for Pain (NRS-Pain). Semi-structured interviews were conducted for children in the intervention group to find out children’s opinion about the games. IBM SPSS 25.0 was used to analyse the quantitative data, whereas content analysis was used to analyse the interview data. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of both pre and post SAS-C scores. However, there was a significant difference of preoperative anxiety measured by the mYPAS between groups, with the intervention group displaying lower anxiety than the control group. In terms of postoperative pain, there was no statistical difference between the two groups. Six categories: attractive points of game, benefits of playing games, game preference, reasons for dislike of game(s), areas for improvement of the games and recommendations for future intervention have emerged from the interviews. Conclusion: Although the mobile games did not show effects on reducing postoperative anxiety and pain, they were effective in reducing preoperative anxiety for children while in the holding area waiting for day surgery. Nevertheless, this pilot study has provided insights on the feasibility of using mobile games in this setting.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147024
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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