Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/145866
Title: THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MINDFULNESS-BASED INTERVENTIONS AMONG CANCER PATIENTS AND SURVIVORS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS
Authors: NG XUNLIN
Keywords: Mindfulness, Cancer, Meta-analysis, Anxiety, Depression, Quality of life.
Issue Date: 21-Jun-2018
Citation: NG XUNLIN (2018-06-21). THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MINDFULNESS-BASED INTERVENTIONS AMONG CANCER PATIENTS AND SURVIVORS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Background: Cancer is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Cancer negatively affects individuals’ quality of life and overall health. Mindfulness-based interventions appear to be promising in the reduction of cancerrelated symptoms. Objectives: This review aimed to systematically summarise and synthesise the best available evidence concerning the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions on anxiety, depression, quality of life, fatigue, stress, posttraumatic growth, and mindfulness among adult cancer patients and survivors. Methods: A literature search was conducted across 10 electronic databases. Only randomised controlled trials were eligible. Two reviewers independently screened the studies, extracted data, and performed quality assessment using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Meta-analyses were conducted using review manager software and standardised mean difference (SMD) was used to determine intervention effects. Subgroup analyses were performed for cancer type, gender and interventions. Heterogeneity was examined using the c2 and I2 statistics. Results: Twenty-nine studies were included with a total of 3,476 participants. Those who received mindfulness-based interventions reported significantly lower anxiety, depression, fatigue, and stress; and greater quality of life, posttraumatic growth, and mindfulness than respondents in control groups. Mindfulness-based art therapy (MBAT) produced the strongest intervention effect for anxiety (SMD = -2.48) and depression (SMD = -2.21), followed by mindfulness-based stress reduction programme (MBSR) and mindfulness-based care recovery (MBCR). The interventions were effective across different cancer types. Conclusion: Mindfulness-based interventions can be used as an adjuvant therapy for the improved management of cancer-related symptoms and health of cancer patients and survivors.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/145866
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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